Center Work: Preserving and Producing Affordable Housing

PROJECTS

This area looks at the feasibility of building infill housing, the potential for more equitable development patterns, and the factors that create stable mixed-income neighborhoods.

Fair Housing in Oakland

Federal Fair Housing Law dictates that it is illegal to discriminate against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin. Yet discrimination is still common. CCI worked with the City of Oakland and its nonprofit organization partners to assure that when housing discrimination or crises occur, there are resources to look to for help. In Oakland, while one organization fields such calls, many organizations work to solve the problem with residents and landlords. CCI worked on a common model for 'intake' of residents and their issues. This will help make the process more efficient as well as allow the City's Community and Economic Development Agency track the system's progress on an annual basis.
 

Greater Richmond Congregations Develop Housing

CCI worked with Urban Habitat and the Greater Richmond Interfaith Project (GRIP) to explore the possibilities for congregations to co-develop their land holdings as affordable housing and mixed-use buildings. This work entails explaining the region-wide need for affordable housing, demystifying who lives in it and the process by which buildings are developed, and introducing appropriate for-profit and nonprofit developers as potential partners.
 

The Future of Infill Housing in California

During the next few decades, California will likely grow at a rate of 4 to 5 million new residents every ten years. If this amount of continuous population growth is to be accommodated without irretrievably harming the state's unique ecosystems, a good deal of it must occur within existing urban and suburban areas.
This downloadable report offers a statewide perspective on the potential to address a portion of California's housing need through infill development.
 

Transit-oriented developments (TODs) are fast becoming reality at major transit stations in the region. Along the BART system alone, eleven communities with stations have completed or approved TODs, and 25 projects are in planning or negotiation phases. Further, station area planning based on MTC’s new TOD policy (Resolution 3434) is underway along proposed several transit extensions or proposed new systems such as Sonoma Marin Area Rail Transit District (SMART) and the Dumbarton Rail project. 
The Terner Prize recognizes successful and innovative affordable housing projects and their leadership teams. The purpose is to spread Terner’s vision and principles to the planning, design and development professions as well as to public officials, community representatives, housing activists, and government and private funders by identifying best practices in the field. 
CCI received a Community Outreach Partnership Centers New Directions (COPC) grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to research whether and how revitalization is possible without significant displacement in communities — specifically Richmond, California — and to provide technical assistance to groups carefully revitalizing the city’s neighborhoods. (This project cross-links with Revitalizing Neighborhoods and Developing Economic Resilience.)
During the next few decades, California will likely grow at a rate of four to five million new residents every ten years. If this amount of continuous population growth is to be accommodated without irretrievably harming the state's unique ecosystems and natural resources, a good deal of it must occur within existing urban and suburban areas.